35mm · Film photography · Photography

At low tide

As I might not have full access to my PC to post for a few days while we’re having some decorating done, I’ve pre-written a few posts with older pictures that I haven’t posted before (I hope!). As I’m a little stuck for time to write them, they’ll each have this same boilerplate text. If I get back on my PC earlier than usual I’ll probably put the remaining ones back into the drafts folder for emergencies.

You’re not going to escape the crappy haiku’s though…

Estuarial beach
A feeding ground for the gulls
As strangers pass by

FIM - At low tide

28-80mm f.3.5-5.6 AF & Fomapan 400.

Taken on 20 February 2019

35mm · Film photography · Photography

On the beach in wintertime

As I might not have full access to my PC to post for a few days while we’re having some decorating done, I’ve pre-written a few posts with older pictures that I haven’t posted before (I hope!). As I’m a little stuck for time to write them, they’ll each have this same boilerplate text. If I get back on my PC earlier than usual I’ll probably put the remaining ones back into the drafts folder for emergencies.

You’re not going to escape the crappy haiku’s though…

Although it looks cold
It was very warm this day
Ice creams in winter!

FILM - February at the coast

Nikon F80, Nikkor 28-80mm f.3.5-5.6 AF & Fomapan 400.

Taken on 20 February 2019

35mm · Film photography · Photography

Seashell

As I might not have full access to my PC to post for a few days while we’re having some decorating done, I’ve pre-written a few posts with older pictures that I haven’t posted before (I hope!). As I’m a little stuck for time to write them, they’ll each have this same boilerplate text. If I get back on my PC earlier than usual I’ll probably put the remaining ones back into the drafts folder for emergencies.

You’re not going to escape the crappy haiku’s though…

Put it to your ear
And hear the sound of the sea
But it’s just your blood

FILM - Seashell

Nikon F80, Nikkor 28-80mm f.3.5-5.6 AF & Fomapan 400.

Taken on 20 February 2019

35mm · Film photography · Photography

Before the riders arrive

As I might not have full access to my PC to post for a few days while we’re having some decorating done, I’ve pre-written a few posts with older pictures that I haven’t posted before (I hope!). As I’m a little stuck for time to write them, they’ll each have this same boilerplate text. If I get back on my PC earlier than usual I’ll probably put the remaining ones back into the drafts folder for emergencies.

You’re not going to escape the crappy haiku’s though…

Hey crappy haiku
Why assault my senses
With your rubbish verse?

FILM - Summer's attractions under construction

Nikon F80, Nikkor 28-80mm f.3.5-5.6 AF & Fomapan 400.

Taken on 20 February 2019

35mm · Film photography · Photography

Bond Bug

When I was a kid the Bond Bug wasn’t an unusual sight, even if not completely commonplace. Every one (to my knowledge) was painted the same bright orange and this, plus the lift-up canopy door and three-wheel design made them special in the eyes of my friends and I. For a while I thought they were so named due to some sort of connection with James Bond – perhaps he drove one in some spy movie I hadn’t yet seen.

They were actually named due to them being manufactured by Bond Cars Ltd (I’m assuming that James Bond wasn’t moonlighting as a vehicle manufacturer…) and were the last in a range of three-wheel vehicles that began in the 1940s with the Bond Minicar.

Despite their sleek and futuristic design, the car was powered by a 700 or 750cc engine with a top speed of just 75mph. I’ve never ridden in a Bond Bug but did have a trip in a Reliant Robin once – another three-wheel car – and based on that experience (it nearly tipped on its side going around a corner!) can only assume that reaching top speed must have been a somewhat terrifying experience.

Did James Bond once drive
His namesake car the Bond Bug?
Well he should have done

Behind the Bond Bug

Nikon F80, Nikkor 28-80mm f/3.5-5.6D & Ilford HP5+. Ilfotec DD-X 1+4 9mins @ 20°.

Taken on 14 August 2021

35mm · Film photography · Photography

Ford Consul Capri

This will be another very concise post – as have several over the past couple of weeks – this time mostly because we had a visitor and so it’s later than I’d normally start typing this. I’ll write longer posts again at some point, honest – maybe even break the three paragraph mark! 🙂

So, we have today the bonnet of a Ford Consul Capri. I know little about this car, but was attracted to the stars on the grille, which have a charmingly kitsch look about them.

Yesterday’s future
The stars on the car you see
Retro envisioned

Consul Capri

Nikon F80, Nikkor 28-80mm f/3.5-5.6D & Ilford HP5+. Ilfotec DD-X 1+4 9mins @ 20°.

Taken on 14 August 2021

35mm · Film photography · Photography

Denby Maiden

Many traction engines are painted in matt-black but others, such as the one shown here – the Denby Maiden – are painted in bold colours – in this case a green body and vivid, banana-yellow wheels. Had the sun been out I’d have likely made some photos on colour film, but it wasn’t, so I didn’t.

I’ve seen many lovely colour photographs made on dull, overcast days, but my success rate in such conditions is not stellar and, as a result, I tend to stick to bright, sunny days for my colour film use.

Our cat is home now and we’re very glad to have him back. He’s not too happy about being confined to the house for the next few days though, and I’m not particulalrly excited about having to clean out his litter tray either (especially the fragrant “incident” he produced this morning :D), but those are the responsibilities of having animals in the family. I wouldn’t have it any other way.

See these vivid scenes
Reduced to monochrome sights
On dull British days

Denby Maiden

Nikon F80, Nikkor 28-80mm f/3.5-5.6D & Ilford HP5+. Ilfotec DD-X 1+4 9mins @ 20°.

Taken on 14 August 2021

35mm · Film photography · Photography

Dodgems not bumper cars

I’ve always thought that the name you choose for this particualt fairground attraction defines you as a person to a degree. Are you someone who loves the anarchy and destruction of ramming your car into your fellows? Or are you the type that thrills at the near misses and skillful escapes required to avoid impacts? I’ve always fallen into the latter group, eager to avoid conflict and trouble where possible in my life. This is complete cod-psychology hokum of course (although I wonder if someone has done a study? 😉 ), but it serves a purpose for today.

After yesterday’s unhappy experience of our cat being hit by a car, we’ve had to take him back to the vet today. Although he was drinking a little yesterday, it soon became apparent that he couldn’t eat – although he was cleary hungry and was pestering us for food. So this morning, following the advice from the vet yesterday, we took him back so they could make sure he got some fluids and nutrition. They decided it would be wise to sedate him and give him a more thorough examination than they could yesterday, including an x-ray, so my wife took him this morning and left him there to be looked after.

We received a call this afternoon that is tongue was not only bruised, but also lacerated, so they have had to put some stitches in. His cheeks were swollen and they’ve also removed some loose teeth. He’s been in the wars somewhat and has been very lucky that it wasn’t much more serious than it was. We should be able to pick him up in the morning and get him on the road to recovery. Fingers are crossed that he will be ok.

I’m hoping he’s a dodgem type cat and will evade any further problems.

Dodgems or bumpers?
What kind of car do you choose?
I dodge and don’t bump.

Dodgem cars

Nikon F80, Nikkor 50mm f/1.8GD & Ilford HP5+. Ilfotec DD-X 1+4 9mins @ 20°.

Taken on 14 August 2021