35mm · Film photography · Photography

Superzoom

When using compact zoom cameras, I rarely shoot them at anything other than their wide end. I’ve found that the zoom either leaves something to be desired in terms of sharpness, and also tends to be severely limited by small minimum aperatures. While shooting the Olympus Superzoom 160 though, I decided to see how it would fare with the final shot on the roll.

It always pays to be careful when using the zoom as, depending on the light available, the camera will fire the flash if you don’t manually disable it using the fiddly little button. Some zoom compacts have a mechanical switch to do this that can be left in the off position unless flash is needed, but most tend to flash automatically with the various flash modes being switched via a small button. It can be easy to forget this and end up with an underexposed shot if you’re not paying attention.

So, being careful to make sure there was enough light, I made the following landscape photo with the camera zoomed in. I can’t remember if it was at the full 160mm setting, but a good way towards it if not. The results are kinda what I expected with a definite softness apparent when compared with photographs made with the camera at it’s wide-angle setting, so I guess my rule of thumb will remain mostly in place.

Don’t zoom in too far
Disapointment may arise
From your photograph

Superzoom

Olympus Superzoom 160 & Agfa APX 100. Ilfotec DD-X 1+4 12.5mins @ 20°.

Taken on 7 August 2021

35mm · Film photography · Photography

A view from Elmton church

A while ago I posted of my adventure crossing an overgrown field to photograph St. Peter’s church at Elmton. Well the field at the lower left of this picture, behind the wall, is the one in question. It looks pretty innocent here, doesn’t it…

Innocent it looks
Though the truth was not so fine
Nettled guardians

Down through Elmton

Olympus Superzoom 160 & Agfa APX 100. Ilfotec DD-X 1+4 12.5mins @ 20°.

Taken on 7 August 2021

35mm · Film photography · Photography

An overgrown barn

This is an old barn in the village of Elmton. I was out shooting the remaining frames of film in an Olympus Sure Shot 160 I got as a freebie along with my XA3 when I made this picture. I wasn’t expecting too much from the camera – it has a pretty slow lens, especially when zoomed, and the last Superzoom model I owned, a 105G, made photos which were a little soft – but it’s surprised me with nice crisp results.

I shall drip-feed further images from the camera over the next few days.

Old barn in a field
Providing shelter for trees
An odd crop I think

Overgrown barn

Olympus Superzoom 160 & Agfa APX 100. Ilfotec DD-X 1+4 12.5mins @ 20°.

Taken on 7 August 2021

35mm · Film photography · Photography

Through the tall grass and nettles

Today’s photo shows another angle of St. Peter’s church at Elmton. This was the view that I spotted as first approaching the village by road, but there was nowhere at this spot where I could park (the roads being quite narrow with no verge that I could pull onto), so I continued into the village and parked my car on the road beside the church. After making a few photos around the church itself I decided to walk back to the vantage point I’d seen earlier. I could have followed the road which, in this picture, passes the wall just in front of the church, heads to the left of the scene, and then takes a 90-degree turn back towards a place close to this spot. But there was a shortcut…

Looking at my maps app on my phone, it was apparent that there was a public footpath through this field which cut the corner. Sure enough, I spotted an old wooden footpath signpost and a stile built into the wall beside the field. Climbing the stile I set off across the field. It quickly became apparent that the grass was longer than I expected and also that very few people must use the path as there was no real evidence of it’s existence, not even in the form of some slightly flattened grass. Nontheless I perservered and made my way down the slope to where my map showed the path exiting the field. As I progressed, the grass in the field began to be joined by clumps of large hardy weeds that I had to skirt and also, worse, nettles! Given I was wearing a pair of cargo shorts, thoughts of stung legs came to the fore of my mind, and I had to take even more care over where I walked.

Eventually I reached the spot where I made this photo, and I ducked into the grass to allow it to provide more prominent foreground interest. It turned out to be the final frame on the roll, so I continued down to the corner of the field and the exit. Unfortunately the exit was conspicuous by it’s almost complete absence, with all that I could see was a rusty kissing gate almose buried in tall weeds and more nettles and then continuous growth for about the next ten feet or so. I could have walked back the way I came, which would have been a sensible option, but the thought of forcing my way through the high grass didn’t appeal, so I decided to chance the overgrown exit instead. It probably took me as long to do this as walking back throuh the field would have done.

I had to procede with great caution, carefully placing my feet as to squash the nettles away from my legs with each step. By some miracle I wasn’t stung a single time, although the final four or five feet involved me making a daring leap across a clump of nettles right where the verge dropped down onto the road. No doubt this would have looked highly amusing to anyone passing by, but thankfully no-one was around.

In the end I had to walk back via the road anyway, so maybe it would have been simpler had I used that route for both legs of the jaunt. But then what would I have written about today? Plus the picture was worthwhile, I think.

These stinging nettles
And not a dock-leaf in sight
A peril for legs

Beyond the tall grass

Olympus OM-2n, Zuiko Auto-S 50mm f/1.8 & Ilford HP5+. Ilfotec DD-X 1+4 9mins @ 20°.

Taken on 12 June 2021

35mm · Film photography · Photography

Kissing gate

While walking through Pleasley Country Park, my route took me through this metal kissing gate. While not a quaint as some of the older wooden gates I’ve seen, it still made for a nice photos I thought.

The name “kissing gate” derives from the gate itself swinging freely, “kissing” the inside of the frame rather than needing to be latched to prevent livestock from passing through. When I was young however, I was told that it was traditional to kiss the person passing the gate with you. While a nicely romantic idea, I have sometimes had to pass through such gates at the same time as complete strangers, so probably not a practical suggestion! 🙂

Kiss from a stranger?
Perhaps not a good idea
In a pandemic

Kissing gate

Olympus OM-2n, Zuiko Auto-S 50mm f/1.8 & Ilford HP5+. Ilfotec DD-X 1+4 9mins @ 20°.

Taken on 12 June 2021

35mm · Film photography · Photography

Through the pasture

Although it probably doesn’t look it from the photograph, the grass in these pasture fields was quite deep – probably a good 8-inches at least. As the footpath was quite loosely defined it meant there was no especially well-trodden route through the fields and so I had to walk through swathes of the tall shoots, which was pretty tiring (especially given the adventure in Monk’s Dale not long before!).

Tired legs in long grass
Thighs powering through and up
On towards Tideswell

Over the pasture

Olympus OM-2n, Zuiko Auto-S 50mm f/1.8 & Ilford HP5+. Ilfotec DD-X 1+4 9mins @ 20°.

Taken on 24 May 2021

Film photography · Medium Format · Photography

The descent into Tideswell

The final three photos I made during my walk around Tideswell Dale, Miller’s Dale, Monk’s Dale and then across the meadows back to Tideswell itself. The final three photos from the Yashica Mat at least – I also shot a few more frames with the OM-2n which had spent most of the day tucked in my backpack.

The skies were beginning to get more threatening by this stage and veils of rain could be seen falling to the south and west. Luckily though, I managed to avoid all the showers. Unluckily, the chip shop where I thought I might treat myself to a well-deserved lunch, was closed. 😦

I wanted some chips
But instead had to go for
A tuna sandwich

Meadow gate
Down the lane to Tideswell
The Flat

Yashica Mat 124G & Ilford HP5+. Ilfotec DD-X 1+4 9mins @ 20°.

Taken on 24 May 2021

Film photography · Medium Format · Photography

Look both ways

Another couple of photos made near the village of Tideswell. I found this location on Google Maps while planning my walking route and decided it would be a good location for a photograph or two.

The puddles on the track add interest but also meant slick mud and, if you look closely, you can see evidence of my passing in the middle of the lane.

The pictures depict the lane in both directions, although not from the same precise point.

Muddy puddle track
On a day with atmosphere
A draw for my eye

The house at the bottom
The other way

Yashica Mat 124G & Ilford HP5+. Ilfotec DD-X 1+4 9mins @ 20°.

Taken on 24 May 2021

Film photography · Medium Format · Photography

In Monk’s Dale

A few weeks ago I wrote about my exhausting hike through Monk’s Dale. Today I’ll share a couple of photos from the hike – or at least the most difficult part through the steep-sided and heavily wooded limestone gorge.

This first image was a point of great relief. It looks back into the gorge that I had just exited through the gap in the wall. Ahead of me lay only a short section of grassy fields before I reached the road (although I then had to hike up the steep incline to the top). The photo is nicely atmospheric but doesn’t really convey the sweat-dripping tiredness I felt at this point.

The beckoning of exploration

This next image was taken part of the way through the thickly wooded area and shows the thick, dripping moss that covered the stones and trees at the foot of the valley. What it doesn’t convey is the autumnal orange colour that this moss displayed.

The valley is a very interesting place photographically, but I’m not sure if I’ll venture back just yet.

My path wandered through
A place of rocks and woodland
Humid and mossy

At the bottom of the valley

Yashica Mat 124G & Ilford HP5+. Ilfotec DD-X 1+4 9mins @ 20°.

Taken on 24 May 2021