The Old Queen’s Head

Dating back almost 550 years, the Old Queen’s Head is the oldest surviving domestic building in Sheffield, constructed at the end of the Plantagenet period. The building became a pub in the 1860s when the venue next door extended into this one. Prior to this the buidling was used as a house and may have been a banqueting hall before that. Mary, Queen of Scots was imprisonned in Sheffield in the late 16th century (although not in this building!) and it’s believed that this is where the pubs name is derived.

FILM - Old Queen's Head

Holga 120N & Kodak Tmax 400.

Taken on 10 January 2020

Crucible Theatre

This is The Crucible Theatre in Sheffield. It was opened in 1971 and, as well as hosting plays and similar performances, has been the venue for the World Snooker Championship since 1977. The theatre has an unusual stage layout with the audience sitting around three of its sides. The building holds Grade II listed status.

Just opposite (to the right of the scene in this photo) lies the Lyceum Theatre, a more traditional (and older – dating back 120 years) venue.

FILM - Crucible

Holga 120N & Kodak Tmax 400.

Taken on 10 January 2020

I am not a number! I am a free man!

A small, selfie me, trapped in one of the spherical water features in Sheffield’s Millennium Square.

FILM - Great ball of steel

Holga 120N & Kodak Tmax 400.

Taken on 10 January 2020

Wellington’s Monument

Stood right beside the twisty oak woodland that I featured yesterday stands Wellington’s Monument. This stone cross features the dedication: “Wellington, Born 1769, Died 1852. Erected 1866 by E.M. Wrench, late 34th Reg’ment” and commemorates Wellington’s victory at the Battle of Waterloo. The cross is visible atop the hillside from the A621 Sheffield Road which passes to the east at the bottom of the valley. Across the valley on Birchen Edge stands another monument, this one dedicated to Admiral Lord Nelson.

FILM - Wellington's Monument

FILM - Wellington's Monument

Olympus OM-1, F.Zuiko 50mm f/1.8 | Zuiko 28mm f/3.g & Ilford Delta 400.

Taken on 4 January 2020

Tangled

A maze of beautiful twisted oaks just below Wellington’s Monument on Baslow Edge. I don’t think I’ve got the best composition here – I’m not sure about the grassy area at lower left – but it’s a location not too far away, so plenty of chance for me to get a better shot in future.

FILM - At the edge of the tangle

Olympus OM-1, F.Zuiko 50mm f/1.8 & Ilford Delta 400.

Taken on 4 January 2020

Abandoned hay

Taken shortly before the photo of the cow that I posted a few days ago, this is farmland near Whiston, South Yorkshire, UK.

I liked the muddy field entrance leading into the shot and the brow of the hill giving the impression that the land goes on for miles (Spoiler alert! It doesn’t – there’s a motorway not far beyond the ridge – sorry to spoil the illusion :)).

There are a lot of farms with haystacks and haybales still in the fields this year, slowly rotting away through the autumn and winter. I can only assume that they were caught in rain before the farmers had chance to wrap them or get them into dry barns. I’ve seen some that have actually grown a fresh green grassy hairstyle!

FILM - Left out too long

Zeiss Mess-Ikonta 524/16 & Ilford HP5+.

Taken on 23 December 2019

The Anvil Stone

I present to you today a couple of pictures of the “Anvil Stone” which sits atop Baslow Edge overlooking the Derwent Valley. I’m not sure if it’s name is official, or one of those things that has just fallen into common usage but you can certainly see how it gets the name.

It was blowing a gale when I first arrived, the wind swooping up the valley sides and buffeting anything close to the edge, so I took care where I stood atop the crags. It’s not a sheer drop along most of the edge (although surely high enough to be potentially fatal in a number of places), but it wouldn’t take that big a fall to sprain an ankle or break a limb or two (or smash delicate cameras!) if you were not to take care.

FILM - Anvil Stone

I entitled this second shot “Jawas” on Flickr as I found the shape of the rock form this angle to be evocative of the Sandcrawler vehicles they use on Tattooine. 🙂

FILM - Jawas

Olympus OM-1, F.Zuiko 50mm f/1.8 & Ilford Delta 400.

Taken on 4 January 2020