35mm · Film photography · Photography

Steps to the beach

There was a pleasing zig-zag to this set of steps leading down to the beach at Hornsea. A couple were descending the steps when I reached the spot and I wondered about grabbing a shot quickly while they were in frame, but they were looking straight at me and it would have been one of those slightly unnerving “they see me“-type pictures where I feel like I’ve somehow been caught. I’m not sure why I felt like that – I take lots of candid pictures – but sometimes it just doesn’t feel like it’s the right thing for some photographs.

Steps to the sand

Olympus 35 RC & Kodak Gold 200. Lab developed. Home scanned and converted with Negative Lab Pro.

Taken on 20 June 2022

35mm · Film photography · Photography

South along the sea wall

If you look very carefully at this picture (you may need to click on it to see it larger on Flickr), you can just make out some of the footprints in the sand that featured in the picture on my blog a few weeks ago. I can’t remember if I took that picture before, or after the one shown here, but they were taken within fairly quick succession either way.

The building you can see is a pub called The Marine. I took a couple of pictures of the pub but neither one was particularly interesting in retrospect, so I didn’t upload them anywhere.

Looking south

Olympus 35 RC & Kodak Gold 200. Lab developed. Home scanned and converted with Negative Lab Pro.

Taken on 20 June 2022

Film photography · Medium Format · Photography

Beach steps

At Hornsea, where the wooden groynes meet the sea wall, concrete steps have been placed to allow people to bypass the wooden structures. The sun was bright and contrasty by the time I made these pictures and, as I had a roll of Fuji Acros in the camera at this point, I thought that these steps might make for decent subjects.

Beach steps
Beach steps
Beach steps

Yashicamat 124G & Fujifilm Acros. Ilfotec DD-X 1+4 9mins @ 20°.

Taken on 20 June 2022

Film photography · Medium Format · Photography

Footprints in the sand

Someone had been walking barefoot across the beach at Hornsea on the day I visited. Whoever they were, they had moved out of sight before I came across their tracks.

I like this picture but can’t help but think that there was a better one to be had. I wanted to keep the building in frame at the upper right, and I wanted a crashing wave as well, both of which I’m happy with, but the placement of the footprints isn’t quite how I’d like it.

Scenes like this require care. walk into the scene and, to quote Joel Meyerovitz, it becomes bruised – in this case the risk that the smooth sand becomes tarnished with my own footprints as well as the unknown walker’s. Maybe I should have sought out more patience but, as usual when I visit somewhere that’s not as easy to get to, I like to try and maximise my value from the day and see as much as I can, which means I tend not to hang around a sinmgle location of photo opportunity for too long. Perhaps I would improve my photography if I did.

Footprints in the sand

Yashicamat 124G & Fujifilm Acros. Ilfotec DD-X 1+4 9mins @ 20°.

Taken on 20 June 2022

Film photography · Medium Format · Photography

Pebble beach

The beach at Hornsea has a lot of pebbles, no doubt in part because of the coastal erosion that is taking place in the region. Pebbles are interesting to look at, with an endless array of shapes, sizes, colours and textures. The colours are multiplied further when the pebbles become wet, their tones becoming more saturated, fragments of minerals sparkling in the sunlight, and some taking on a crystaline, semi-translucent appearance.

A long time in the making

I wondered as I stood there, how long the process of taking a rough chunk of rock and smoothing it to an organically sleek pebble would take. “How long is a piece of string?” might be a suitable retort as, given the range of different types of rock and mineral, plus the fact that the process never ends, each individual piece being constantly weathered until it becomes sand, but it’s still something that I expect will take a considerable duration.

Foam and pebbles

So I was quite surprised to see a large pebble formed out of a section of brickwork, complete with mortar holding the components together. While I’ve no idea when this chunk of masonry began it’s transformation, I expect it’s far more recent than I might have expected. I took a phot of the brick-pebble but it’s on a roll of film I’ve yet to develop. Hopefully, if it has worked out ok, I’ll post it on the blog.

Crash

Yashicamat 124G & Kodak Gold 200. Lab developed. Home scanned and converted with Negative Lab Pro.

Taken on 20 June 2022

35mm · Film photography · Photography

North Landing

The view from North Landing near Flamborough. Although on the east coast of England, because it is on a promontory, this view is actually looking to the north. Setting off on a straight line from here would take you right over the top of the world without hitting land until you reached Wrangel Island, off the northern coast of the Russian mainland to the west of Alaska. It would be a long and arduous voyage for one of the small boats seen in this scene.

North Landing-2

Olympus XA3 & Ilford Pan HP5+. Ilfotec DD-X 1+4 9mins 20°.

Taken on 14 March 2022

Film photography · Medium Format · Photography

Fred Flintstone’s bowling ball

I spent some time trying to get a composition I was happy with here. The jumble of large chalk pebbles on the beach looked nice in the sunlight and I was keen to get a photo, but it took some effort and fiddling with the tripod. I still don’t think it’s the best I could have gotten, but I did like this distinctive looking rock with its bowling-ball type trio of holes on top. I’m not sure even Fred Flintstone would have scored a strike with this mis-shape though.

Ten-pin bowling, Flintstones-style

Bronica ETRSi, Zenzanon 75mm f/2.8 PE & Lomography Color Negative 100 .

Taken on 14 March 2022

Film photography · Medium Format · Photography

Boats at Flamborough North Landing

I visited the Yorkshire coast a few weeks ago, visiting Flamborough – specifically North Landing and then a walk along the clifftop path to Flamborough Head, where the lighthouse resides.

The two pictures in today’s post are from North Landing. This used to be the launch point for the Flamborough lifeboat and the steep concrete launch slide is a major feature of the walk down to the sand (it is just to the right of the decaying boat in the first photo). The lifeboat has now moved to South Landing and the ramp and boathouse are no longer in use – for their original purposes at least – although the boathouse now serves as a cafe and grille.

North Landing

The walk down to the beach is quite steep and the sand is very soft, making progress across it away from the firmer ground of the water line quite an energy intensive process. The walk back to the top is pretty good exercise for thigh and calf too!

I’ll be posting a series of shots from this trip over the coming week or so.

This was the first roll of film that I converted with Negative Lab Pro and I’m pretty happy with the results.

Double prow

Bronica ETRSi, Zenzanon 75mm f/2.8 PE & Lomography Color Negative 100 .

Taken on 14 March 2022

35mm · Film photography · Photography

On the beach

Cleethorpes has a fairly long, straight run of beach with the pier stood maybe about halfway along its length. The pier, and the big wheel and helter-skelter that stand not too far away are prominent landmarks wherever you stand on the shore.

Being situated at the end of the Humber estuary, the beach at Cleethorpes is aluvial in texture, the sand being a dark muddy brown as it’s probably made up in a significant part by deposits from the estuary. The upper parts of the beach are sandy in a more traditional way and I wonder if this sand has not been artificially placed there for tourists. On the day I visited there was an excavator spreading sand around the upper part of the beach down past the pier. I have a photograph of that too, so I might post it on here at some point.

On the beach

Olympus OM-2N, Zuiko Auto-S 0mm f/1.8 & Ilford Delta 100. Ilfotec DD-X 1+4 12mins @ 20°.

Taken on 31 January 2022