35mm · Film photography · Photography

Looking out to sea

Looking out to sea seems to be an enduring calling to many people when visiting the coast, certainly in the UK, but also, I suspect, around the globe. Every seaside resort I’ve ever visited has benches and shelters along the promenade, along harbour walls, and atop cliffs and promontories, for the purpose of providing somewhere to rest while looking at the ocean beyond. Coin-operated telescopes provide the means of a close-up inspection, should something interesting be present on the water. There are car-parks designed in a such a way as to provide access to the view without leaving the comfort of the vehicle (and in the UK, given our tendency to inclement weather, this is perhaps wise).

I remember as a child visiting the beach with my grandparents in the rain. We would just sit in the car, eat sandwiches, drink pop or hot drinks from a thermos-flask, and watch the tide come in or retreat. If the weather was favourable, we’d get to venture onto the sand with our granddad, while grandma remained in the car, often with the aim of building a sandcastle that we could then subsequently watch be destroyed by the incoming waves while we sat back in the car. The castle fallen, and night beginning to fall, we’d return to the caravan for cocoa and bed.

There’s definitely a draw to looking at the sea, even on a calm day. Something about being at the edge of the world and imagining what might lie beyond some distant horizon (usually Denmark in our case, given the east coast of England was generally our destination of choice). Often times it’s older people who seem to do this the most. Perhaps the sea offers a glimpse of something else, something poignant, something nostalgic. Or maybe they just need a sit down more than the young.

FILM - Together

Olympus 35RC & Eastman Double-X.

Taken on 13 September 2019

35mm · Film photography · Photography

Seaside steps

FILM - Beach steps

This is the view looking north from the Lincolnshire seaside resort of Mablethorpe. There is a small promentory at this point on the shore above the outfall from The Cut, a drain that takes water from the surrounding low-lying countryside – mostly agricultural land – and this section of steps leading down to the beach is at the easternmost point.

The steps form part of an extensive system of coastal defenses that were built and strengthened following the devastating North Sea Flood that occurred in 1953. This winter storm hit on the night of Saturday 31 January and, coupled with a high spring tide, resulted in a storm surge of over 5 metres above the average sea level in some areas. Large areas of low-lying coastal land were deluged in the countries bordering the North Sea, particularly The Netherlands, where 1,836 deaths were recorded. Although loss of life was less severe in England and Scotland, there was still a tragic loss of 336 people. The flood waters reached as far as 2 miles inland in places and forced the evacuation of over 30,000 people from their homes.

The photograph below shows the outfall where The Cut enters the North Sea. This area is submerged at high tide.

FILM - At low tide

Olympus 35RC & Eastman Double-X.

Taken on 13 September 2019

35mm · Film photography · Photography

Baywatch

Ok, so you’d be unlikely to see The Hoff or Pamela Anderson here in Scarborough, even twenty-five years ago, but it’s all the same thing really, isn’t it? Well, maybe without the L.A. glamour, hot weather, and crime-fighting shenanigans.

FILM - Baywatch

Pentax Espio 140M & Fuji Superia 100 (expired 2008).

Taken on 13 July 2019

35mm · Film photography · Photography

Nice for the time of year

This was taken back in February, when we had a mini heat wave in the UK, resulting in record-breaking temperatures. I’ve re-scanned the image today as I’ve just picked up a Plustek 8100 35mm film scanner. I’m keeping the Epson V550 fot medium format scans and other flatbed related stuff, but the Plustek produces notably better scans on 135 format negatives (not tried slides yet). I’ll scan most frames at 2400dpi to save on file space, but the shots I like that contain plenty of detail will be scanned at 3600dpi (which is supposedly the scanner’s actual max resolution – although it will scan at higher dpi rates than that).

FILM - Nice for the time of year

Canon Sure Shot Telemax & Ilford HP5+.

Taken on 20 February 2019

35mm · Film photography · Photography

Out into the world

Another photo from the Canon Sure Shot Telemax, although this time I do recall taking the shot. A good job really, given that I only took it a few weeks ago.

I thought the composition was a good one when I made the photograph, but again I’m very pleased with the way the little compact has handled the scene. I’d used up the roll of film in my F80 when I took this, and would have missed the shot if I’d not had the Telemax in my pocket.

FILM - Out into the world

Canon Sure Shot Telemax & Ilford HP5+.

Taken on 20 February 2019

35mm · Film photography · Photography

Cleethorpes part #2

This will be a shorter post than part one, no real need to go over the events of the day a second time, but if anyone wants to know, here they are in Cleethorpes part #1.

This set of shots were all taken on the beach (a couple of others – the tyre tracks, and the pier supports – in the last entry were taken at the same time). Again, the camera was my Pentax P30T with a Rikenon 50mm f/2 lens.

While my wife and boys went into an arcade near the foot of the pier, I excused myself to take some photos on the beach. The tide was still out, and although it had turned by this time, there was still plenty of exposed sand (which, as Cleethorpes is at the mouth of the Humber estuary, is a muddy brown colour – the only golden sand available is at the top of the beach and I suspect has been put there by man, rather than nature, to make a more attractive setting for sand castles and donkey rides).

Most of the shots here are of the breakwater just north of the pier, but there are a couple of buoys there too to add a touch of spice (I need to get out more…). Again, the Bergger Pancro 400 has resulted in grainy, but pleasing shots, with plenty of contrast. My post-processing on these has consisted of adding a little extra contrast, tweaks to the highlights, whites and blacks, and a small push on the clarity slider in Lightroom.

The breakwater pictures are my favourites here, especially the first and third shots (I think shot one may be slightly soft in the foreground, but not enough to detract).

FILM - Breakwater

FILM - Breakwater

FILM - Breakwater

FILM - Breakwater

A few of my close-up shots from this roll were out of focus, and at first I was concerned about a lens or focussing issue, but other shots like the one below, are nice and sharp so, pending it happening again in future, I’m going to pin the blame on the fool holding the camera.

FILM - Barnacles

FILM - Beached

FILM - Beached-2