Film photography · Medium Format · Photography

At the back of the museum

I’ve walked around the outside of Kelham Island museum on a number of occasions but not beein inside a single time. One day I will. There’s a road beside the museum leading to a visitor car-park and the scene in today’s photo is close to this area. Visitors walking through the museum come out of the buildings at the right of this scene, and go through the gate at the left (beside the carven guardsman). A low wall and fence enclose the area.

I’m not sure what these parts of the building are, perhaps small workshops or maybe a former office area. Whatever the case, I liked the detailing in the windows and brickwork.

Single-glazed windows
Let in noise and let out heat
But look nice on film

Workshops

Fujica GW690 & Ilford HP5+. Ilfotec DD-X 1+4 9mins @ 20°.

Taken on 4 July 2021

Film photography · Medium Format · Photography

Making the same picture

The photo posted here today is a composition I’ve shot on quite a few occasions. It’s one that just seems to work and always catches my eye. I’m not sure how many times the scene has featured on the blog (at least once before, here), but I know I have several different versions. This one is, I believe, the first time I’ve shot it on 6×9 though.

Again

Fujica GW690 & Ilford HP5+. Ilfotec DD-X 1+4 9mins @ 20°.

Taken on 4 July 2021

Film photography · Medium Format · Photography

Down a wet cobbled street

The Kelham Island area of Sheffield has provided me with pretty good pickings from a photographic point of view and it’s often a place I’ll head to if I’ve got some camera time but no real idea of where to go. The area isn’t huge but there are still parts of it that I’ve not seen. Plus, the ongoing gentrification means that there are always new things popping up down there.

It’s a little sad to see the old industry converted into apartments, but the industry was mostly gone anyway and the other option would probably have been a decline into dereliction. At least this way a lot of the architectural heritage survives with new purpose.

It was a day of changeable weather when I made this photo and five minutes earlier I’d had to rush for shelter (along with a few other people) when the heavens opened. The rain on the floor in the photo is the evidence of the downpour.

My small umbrella
Under the onslaught of rain
Was insufficient

Rainy-day cobbled streets

Fujica GW690 & Ilford HP5+. Ilfotec DD-X 1+4 9mins @ 20°.

Taken on 4 July 2021

Film photography · Medium Format · Photography

Mossy ruin

A came across this place while wandering in the Peak District last week. I’ve passed close by before and never realised it was there but, now that I do, I think I’ll pay it further visits. While I’m pretty happy with how this photo turned out, I think that – with the right conditions – there might be much better images to be had. The autumn should be very nice here, I think.

Tumbledown structure
Hidden in the old oak woods
A nice place to find

Mossy ruin

Fujica GW690 & Fujifilm Superia 100 (expired 2008).

Taken on 29 March 2021

Film photography · Medium Format · Photography

Back to the Peak District

With the easing of the lockdown in England it has meant the ability to travel a little further afield for photography has returned, so I’ve taken a couple of trips out into the Peak District – the closest bit, nothing too crazy! On both occasions I set out quite early and the car-park I’ve used has been almost empty, but has been busy when I’ve returned a few hours later. There are lots of places to venture from the car-park though, so it’s easy to keep plenty of distance from other people.

It’s nice to go somewhere different to make photos again and I’ve a big list of destinations for when the rules ease further from next week. It’s quite easy to get caught up in the act of taking pictures now the opportunity is back, so on today’s hike I made sure to take time to take things in through my senses without a viewfinder acting as a window to everything.

Countryside hiking
Feeling fresh air on my skin
It is wonderful

Gate

Fujica GW690 & Fujifilm Superia 100 (expired 2008).

Taken on 29 March 2021

Film photography · Medium Format · Photography

Velvia flyover

Back when I got my GW690 it arrived with a roll of Velvia 50 already loaded with a single frame shot by the previous owner. Keen to try out my new camera I hurried out on the first opportunity and shot the remaining seven shots on the roll. They were all disappointing.

Velvia is a beautiful film, but you need to treat it properly. Rushing about on a slightly overcast winter day is not the best way to get quality results. It showed, and I wasn’t happy with what I had made. My next few rolls through the camera were black and white, I took greater care with what I was doing, and the camera started to show me what it was capable of.

The disappointing Velvia photos went in my negatives (or in this case, positives!) binder to be quietly forgotten.

Yesterday, because I’ve just bought some more expired Velvia (and Sensia) reversal film, I was looking through my older E6 images and came across the GW690 set. While I still think most of them are disappointing, one of them looked like it might have some potential, so I decided to see if I could breathe some life into it, and the result is presented here today.

It’s not the best photo, but it has a nice early winter morning feel about it and I like the light on the grass and the hazy sky. I’m not one-hundred percent sure about the yellow sunlight on the bridge supports, but it was catching a warm early morning glow so perhaps they’re not too far off the mark. Anyway, here it is for you to make up your own minds. Was it worth the effort do you think?

Don’t rush with slide film
Treat it with care or you’ll risk
Fujichrome failure

Morning light flyover

Fujica GW690 & Fujichrome Velvia 50.

Taken on 1 December 2020

Film photography · Medium Format · Photography

Portrait of a (bigger) camera

Another couple of lockdown camera portraits, this time my Fujica GW690. It’s a bit of a big beastie!

I’ve just got back from a run – my Couch to 5K journey began afresh this week now my calf is mostly better – and am feeling good about myself as a result of the exercise (such as is with week one of C25K at least!), and I can now hopefully have a relaxed Saturday evening and Sunday with no real plans other than catching up on some TV, maybe read for a while, and hopefully develop a roll of film to keep the blog fed with fresh pictures. 🙂

A pair of strong arms
Can be of great benefit
With Texas Leicas

Gw690
Gw690-2

Yashica Mat 124G, close-up #1 lens & Ilford HP5+. Ilfotec DD-X 1+4 9mins @ 20°.

Taken on 10 January 2021

Film photography · Medium Format · Photography

Snowy edgelands

Edgelands are defined as “the transitional, liminal areas of space to be found on the boundaries of country and town“. I’m not sure that the location in today’s photo is quite true to that description as, while it’s on the edge of an urban area, more recent development means that if merges quite quickly into further, newer, suburban developments long before it can merge into the countryside proper. It seems to be a feature of many industrial cities though that there is no defined boundary between countryside and town. Instead, as you reach closer to the boundaries, so patches of land where perhaps lost industry once stood, or where no development is possible due to natural features such as rivers and their flood-plains, become more commonplace, penned in by industrial estates or suburban housing.

I enjoy getting out into the countryside very much, but I do have an affinity for these semi-industrial / semi-urban areas too. I like the way that I can find relics of the coal-mining that used to be prevalent around here. Disused railway lines, bridges, and brickwork bereft of purpose can be located amongst bugeoning new-growth woodland like the remnants of some past civilisation.

Hidden in the soil
Fragments of brick and metal
Industry as was

Near the scrapyard

Fujica GW690 & Ilford HP5+. Ilfotec DD-X 1+4 9mins @ 20°.

Taken on 29 December 2020