35mm · Film photography · Photography

At low tide

As I might not have full access to my PC to post for a few days while we’re having some decorating done, I’ve pre-written a few posts with older pictures that I haven’t posted before (I hope!). As I’m a little stuck for time to write them, they’ll each have this same boilerplate text. If I get back on my PC earlier than usual I’ll probably put the remaining ones back into the drafts folder for emergencies.

You’re not going to escape the crappy haiku’s though…

Estuarial beach
A feeding ground for the gulls
As strangers pass by

FIM - At low tide

28-80mm f.3.5-5.6 AF & Fomapan 400.

Taken on 20 February 2019

35mm · Film photography · Photography

On the beach in wintertime

As I might not have full access to my PC to post for a few days while we’re having some decorating done, I’ve pre-written a few posts with older pictures that I haven’t posted before (I hope!). As I’m a little stuck for time to write them, they’ll each have this same boilerplate text. If I get back on my PC earlier than usual I’ll probably put the remaining ones back into the drafts folder for emergencies.

You’re not going to escape the crappy haiku’s though…

Although it looks cold
It was very warm this day
Ice creams in winter!

FILM - February at the coast

Nikon F80, Nikkor 28-80mm f.3.5-5.6 AF & Fomapan 400.

Taken on 20 February 2019

35mm · Film photography · Photography

Seashell

As I might not have full access to my PC to post for a few days while we’re having some decorating done, I’ve pre-written a few posts with older pictures that I haven’t posted before (I hope!). As I’m a little stuck for time to write them, they’ll each have this same boilerplate text. If I get back on my PC earlier than usual I’ll probably put the remaining ones back into the drafts folder for emergencies.

You’re not going to escape the crappy haiku’s though…

Put it to your ear
And hear the sound of the sea
But it’s just your blood

FILM - Seashell

Nikon F80, Nikkor 28-80mm f.3.5-5.6 AF & Fomapan 400.

Taken on 20 February 2019

35mm · Film photography · Photography

Before the riders arrive

As I might not have full access to my PC to post for a few days while we’re having some decorating done, I’ve pre-written a few posts with older pictures that I haven’t posted before (I hope!). As I’m a little stuck for time to write them, they’ll each have this same boilerplate text. If I get back on my PC earlier than usual I’ll probably put the remaining ones back into the drafts folder for emergencies.

You’re not going to escape the crappy haiku’s though…

Hey crappy haiku
Why assault my senses
With your rubbish verse?

FILM - Summer's attractions under construction

Nikon F80, Nikkor 28-80mm f.3.5-5.6 AF & Fomapan 400.

Taken on 20 February 2019

35mm · Film photography · Photography

Bond Bug

When I was a kid the Bond Bug wasn’t an unusual sight, even if not completely commonplace. Every one (to my knowledge) was painted the same bright orange and this, plus the lift-up canopy door and three-wheel design made them special in the eyes of my friends and I. For a while I thought they were so named due to some sort of connection with James Bond – perhaps he drove one in some spy movie I hadn’t yet seen.

They were actually named due to them being manufactured by Bond Cars Ltd (I’m assuming that James Bond wasn’t moonlighting as a vehicle manufacturer…) and were the last in a range of three-wheel vehicles that began in the 1940s with the Bond Minicar.

Despite their sleek and futuristic design, the car was powered by a 700 or 750cc engine with a top speed of just 75mph. I’ve never ridden in a Bond Bug but did have a trip in a Reliant Robin once – another three-wheel car – and based on that experience (it nearly tipped on its side going around a corner!) can only assume that reaching top speed must have been a somewhat terrifying experience.

Did James Bond once drive
His namesake car the Bond Bug?
Well he should have done

Behind the Bond Bug

Nikon F80, Nikkor 28-80mm f/3.5-5.6D & Ilford HP5+. Ilfotec DD-X 1+4 9mins @ 20°.

Taken on 14 August 2021

35mm · Film photography · Photography

Ford Consul Capri

This will be another very concise post – as have several over the past couple of weeks – this time mostly because we had a visitor and so it’s later than I’d normally start typing this. I’ll write longer posts again at some point, honest – maybe even break the three paragraph mark! 🙂

So, we have today the bonnet of a Ford Consul Capri. I know little about this car, but was attracted to the stars on the grille, which have a charmingly kitsch look about them.

Yesterday’s future
The stars on the car you see
Retro envisioned

Consul Capri

Nikon F80, Nikkor 28-80mm f/3.5-5.6D & Ilford HP5+. Ilfotec DD-X 1+4 9mins @ 20°.

Taken on 14 August 2021

35mm · Film photography · Photography

Denby Maiden

Many traction engines are painted in matt-black but others, such as the one shown here – the Denby Maiden – are painted in bold colours – in this case a green body and vivid, banana-yellow wheels. Had the sun been out I’d have likely made some photos on colour film, but it wasn’t, so I didn’t.

I’ve seen many lovely colour photographs made on dull, overcast days, but my success rate in such conditions is not stellar and, as a result, I tend to stick to bright, sunny days for my colour film use.

Our cat is home now and we’re very glad to have him back. He’s not too happy about being confined to the house for the next few days though, and I’m not particulalrly excited about having to clean out his litter tray either (especially the fragrant “incident” he produced this morning :D), but those are the responsibilities of having animals in the family. I wouldn’t have it any other way.

See these vivid scenes
Reduced to monochrome sights
On dull British days

Denby Maiden

Nikon F80, Nikkor 28-80mm f/3.5-5.6D & Ilford HP5+. Ilfotec DD-X 1+4 9mins @ 20°.

Taken on 14 August 2021

35mm · Film photography · Photography

Out near Thorpe Salvin

A bunch of photos that I made on a big looping walk from Thorpe Salvin a few weeks ago. I’ve posted several photos from the same walk in previous posts here, here, here, here & here.

These are all from the second roll of film I started during the walk, some expired Fuji Superia 100. It expired 12 years ago but has been cold-stored and it still looks great. I sometimes overexpose it slightly, but it looks good shot at box speed too, as can be seen in the photos here.

It’s a bit of a random selection of some of the things I passed while walking and I’ll post them as they come, without any commentary.

The corner of Little Lane

Those bungalows again

Country airstrip

Fence and chain

More big daisies

Dove on a streetlight

Nikon F80, Nikkor 28-80mm f/3.5-5.6 & Fuji Superia 100 (expired 2008). The last shot was with my Sigma 105mm f/2.8 OS HSM lens.

Taken on 31 May 2020

35mm · Film photography · Photography

More Ektachrome re-scans and a street portraiture outing

I decided today to start a long-considered project to make portraits of strangers. It’s not an original idea – many others have done it before – but the aim is to make one-hundred portraits of people I don’t know. This is not something that comes naturally to me, both from a technical photographic angle – portraiture is not something I’ve done very much of – and also from a social aspect. By nature, I’m something of a shy, somewht introverted person, and approaching someone I don’t know to ask them if I can make their portrait is a definite challenge. So it was with no little trepidation that I decided to make a start today.

I decided that I will shoot all the portraits with my Yashica Mat 124G and use Kodak Portra 400. The choice of camera is for a number of reasons:

  1. It makes nice photographs
  2. I like the square format for portraits
  3. I’ll hopefully get better quality images from a medium format camera
  4. Because it’s a TLR, I hope that it will be disarming / start conversations in a way that an SLR maybe wouldn’t

The Portra was chosed because:

  1. It looks great
  2. It has a excellent exposure latitude which gives me flexibility when shooting in changeable light.

The first person I asked today said no, which wasn’t the best for my already shaky confidence, but I perservered, and the next two people both agreed to let me make their portraits. In all, out of fourteen people I asked, just three declined to take part, and there was no animosity whatsoever from anyone.

I photographed a range of people, both men and women, young and old. A couple of my subjects had cameras, so I approached them thinking that they might be more embracing of the idea of my taking their photo. A couple were street musicians, so they’re probably used to being photographed. Everyone else was a person who looked approachable, including a girl manning an ice-cream van, a couple of men who looked like they might be waiting for their wives to come out of shops, and a girl carrying a large potted plant. The latter girl asked what I would do with the photos, so I gave her the name of my blog. If you’re reading this, thank you agian for letting me make a portrait. 🙂

On the whole I was very pleased with how the day turned out and it gives me confidence to do the same again. I’ll get the film sent off for processing next week and will hopefully have some results in a few days time. Fingers crossed that they turn out ok!

For today however, I’ll post a few more of the re-scanned Ektachrome slides that I shot at a steam rally last year. The film really seems to lift in good light.

FILM - Steam Rally 2019 Ektachrome scans-4

FILM - Steam Rally 2019 Ektachrome scans-6

Steam rally scenes

A variety of vehicles

Land Rover

Nikon F80, Nikkor 28-80mm f/3.5-5.6 D & Kodak Ektachrome.

Taken on 30 June 2019