Film photography · Medium Format · Photography

A print perhaps?

It’s very rare that I make prints of my photographs. Occasionally, I’ll get a bunch of cheap mini prints of random shots as they can be nice things to put in gifts, and I had a print made of a picture my cousin liked for her to hang on her wall, but rarely do I make a print for myself.

I might get a print of the picture posted here today though. It’s not a perfect image and probably not something anyone would buy commercially, but I like the photo – it’s evocative and also, because I was there when it was made, personal. It’s mine. It would be a nice thing to look at when I’m at work, I think, maybe even moreso when the dark winter days kick in proper.

To the beach

Yashicamat 124G & Fujifilm Pro 160NS. Lab developed, home scanned, & converted with Negative Lab Pro.

Taken on 17 September 2022

35mm · Film photography · Photography

I’ll shoot what he shot

While I was in Hornsea a few weeks back I noticed this man photographing something on the other side of the seawall. To be fair, I knew exactly what he was photographing – the waves crashing against the defences – but I wanted in on this sweet ocean action so, after taking a quick candid, I waited my turn and then made my own picture.

The guy in the photo looked like he had a telephoto attached to his camera, which probably benefited the scene when compared with the fixed 42mm glass on my Olympus 35RC, but the best camera (and lens!) is the one you have with you, right?

Shooting a man shooting the sea
What the man saw

Olympus 35 RC & Kodak Gold 200. Lab developed. Home scanned and converted with Negative Lab Pro.

Taken on 20 June 2022

35mm · Film photography · Photography

Erosion in action

Another pebble, albeit one that appears more natural in character than the giant housebrick pebble I posted on Sunday. It’d be cool to rewind time to see this little lump of rock’s history. Where has it been, where was it sited before it entered the sea? How far has it travelled, and for how long? Was it a bigger rock that has been whittled down to size, or was it always this small?

Pebble formation

Olympus 35 RC & Kodak Gold 200. Lab developed. Home scanned and converted with Negative Lab Pro.

Taken on 20 June 2022

35mm · Film photography · Photography

South along the sea wall

If you look very carefully at this picture (you may need to click on it to see it larger on Flickr), you can just make out some of the footprints in the sand that featured in the picture on my blog a few weeks ago. I can’t remember if I took that picture before, or after the one shown here, but they were taken within fairly quick succession either way.

The building you can see is a pub called The Marine. I took a couple of pictures of the pub but neither one was particularly interesting in retrospect, so I didn’t upload them anywhere.

Looking south

Olympus 35 RC & Kodak Gold 200. Lab developed. Home scanned and converted with Negative Lab Pro.

Taken on 20 June 2022

35mm · Film photography · Photography

The start of the Trans Pennine Way

I’ve posted many photos taken along the Tranbs Penine Way on this blog, mostly because a section of it – the southern spur that leads to Chesterfield – is only half a kilometer from my home. The photo today shows the very first time I saw the starting point (or, I guess, the finish if you travel the other way) for the main east / west route. This post marks the easternmost point at Hornsea on the Yorkshire coast beside the North Sea. The far end of the trail lies in Southport in Lancashire on the edge of the Irish Sea.

I’ve never been to Southport before, but perhaps a trip will be in order someday – I do like seaside resorts after all, and it would allow me to pair up both ends of the trail.

The start of the Trans-Pennine Trail

Olympus 35 RC & Ilford FP4+. Ilfotec DD-X 1+4 10mins @ 20°.

Taken on 20 June 2022

35mm · Film photography · Photography

On a North Sea beach

My plan to get more film developed today has not borne fruit, so for now it means I’ll have to dip into the archive to find a shot (for today at least – I still plan to get another roll developed tomorrow). The good news is that it wasn’t procrastination at fault, but the fact that I went out with the camera this morning and shot a couple of new rolls. I was using the ETRSi, so that should mean 30 more potential shots to feed the fires that keep the blog going.

Today’s photo then is from late spring last year, made during a daytrip my wife and I made to Bridlington, a seaside town on the Yorkshire coast. I thought that I’d posted this one before, but looking through my posts I can’t see it on here. It’s one of my favourites from this roll too.

On a North Sea beach

Olympus XA3 & Ilford HP5+. Ilfotec DD-X 1+4 9mins @ 20°.

Taken on 27 May 2021

35mm · Film photography · Photography

Sitting on a wall in a seaside town

After yesterdays photo of a coiled heap of rope on a harbour wall, today there’s a picture of two fellas on a harbour wall (albeit a different section). This trip to Bridlington has, so far, been my only visit to the coast since last autumn. I’ll hopefully get at least a couple more visits before the summer comes to an end though. Because I don’t go too often it always has a charm, and there are always things to photograph.

The British seaside
The beach, the sea, the sunshine
And some fish and chips

Coastal conversations

Olympus XA3 & Ilford HP5+. Ilfotec DD-X 1+4 9mins @ 20°.

Taken on 27 May 2021

35mm · Film photography · Photography

People on a beach

People walk on the wide, sandy beach where it stretches northwards from Mablethorpe towards Saltfleet, Donna Nook, and then on to Cleethorpes, Grimsby and the Humber estuary beyond.

I’ve spotted what might be light leaks on a few frames from this roll. Might need to give the OM-2n a once over – I suspect it has no light seals at all at present!

On the beach

Olympus OM-2n, Zuiko Auto-T 135mm f/3.5 & Ilford Delta 400. Ilfotec DD-X 1+4 8mins @ 20°.

Taken on 11 September 2020

35mm · Film photography · Photography

Looking out to sea

Looking out to sea seems to be an enduring calling to many people when visiting the coast, certainly in the UK, but also, I suspect, around the globe. Every seaside resort I’ve ever visited has benches and shelters along the promenade, along harbour walls, and atop cliffs and promontories, for the purpose of providing somewhere to rest while looking at the ocean beyond. Coin-operated telescopes provide the means of a close-up inspection, should something interesting be present on the water. There are car-parks designed in a such a way as to provide access to the view without leaving the comfort of the vehicle (and in the UK, given our tendency to inclement weather, this is perhaps wise).

I remember as a child visiting the beach with my grandparents in the rain. We would just sit in the car, eat sandwiches, drink pop or hot drinks from a thermos-flask, and watch the tide come in or retreat. If the weather was favourable, we’d get to venture onto the sand with our granddad, while grandma remained in the car, often with the aim of building a sandcastle that we could then subsequently watch be destroyed by the incoming waves while we sat back in the car. The castle fallen, and night beginning to fall, we’d return to the caravan for cocoa and bed.

There’s definitely a draw to looking at the sea, even on a calm day. Something about being at the edge of the world and imagining what might lie beyond some distant horizon (usually Denmark in our case, given the east coast of England was generally our destination of choice). Often times it’s older people who seem to do this the most. Perhaps the sea offers a glimpse of something else, something poignant, something nostalgic. Or maybe they just need a sit down more than the young.

FILM - Together

Olympus 35RC & Eastman Double-X.

Taken on 13 September 2019