35mm · Film photography · Photography

Big and little bandstands

Two bandstands, both in Queen’s Park, Chesterfield – the same place I photographed the cricket field. At least I think they’re both bandstands – the second one is much larger and almost looks like a carousel with nothing to ride.

Perhaps in summer
The sound of a band may sound
Tiddly om pom pom

Queen's Park bandstand
Underneath the octagon

Canon Sure Shot Supreme & Kodak Colorplus.

Taken on 25 April 2021

35mm · Film photography · Photography

Below a crooked spire

As I’m still top-and-tailing my camera review post (it’ll no doubt be a crushing disappointment after I’ve carped on about it so much over the last week or so…) so I’ll drop in a few photos I took inside St. Mary and All Saints church in Chesterfield a couple off weeks ago. This is the church famous for it’s crooked spire, a phenomenon believed to be caused by uneven heating of the lead in the stucture by the sun. While I’ve made a number of photos of the spire and outside of the building in the past, I’ve only ventured inside on two or three occasions – including this one.

I quite enjoy making pictures of the artefacts and ephemera within churches. Theres a wonderful sense of history to be had. As church interiors are often quite dimly lit, and as the use of tripods or (especially) flash are generally forbidden, I decided to shoot some Ilford HP5+ pushed to 1600asa. While this increased the grain and contrast a little, I’ve found that HP5+ handles both very well and they are not overwhelming at all.

Crooked
The famous Crooked Spire, viewd from a southerly aspect. This shot was made on an ealier visit using my Minolta SRT-101b, Rokkor 50mm f/1.7 using some expired Kodak Tri-C Pan film.
Socially distanced nave
The nave of the church looking east to the altar. Note the now de rigeur Covid-19 social distancing sign.
Font cover
A stout wooden cover atop the font.
Eagle
A lectern in the form of an eagle.
Organ pipes
The pipes of the church organ.
Awaiting musicians
Chairs and music stands.

Various statues, shrines and other paraphernalia of the church.

Figurines-2
Jesus in a window
Double helix
Artefacts

Nikon F80, Sigma 105mm f/2.8 OS HSM & Ilford HP5+ (@1600asa). Ilfotec DD-X 1+4 13mins @ 20°

Taken on 5 September 2020

35mm · Film photography · Photography

Mormon church & Christ Church

Continuing with an irregular theme of churches that I photograph without ever using them for anything else…

This is The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, a Mormon church not too far from Chesterfield town centre and I usually pass it if when visit the town. It’s a modern building, but looks great when it catches some nice light.

Mormon church

Across the road from the Mormon church is Christ Church, a building I didn’t even realise was of religious use until I stopped to photograph it when I saw how it looked in the morning sun. According to Google the main building is a parish centre rather than a church, although the entrance at the south side of the building is clearly labelled as Christ Church, so perhaps it’s multi-purpose?.

Christ Church
Church or parish centre?

Minolta SRT 101b, Rokkor 50mm f/1.7 & Kodak Tri-X (expired circa 2000-ish). Ilfotec DD-X 1+4 8mins @ 20°

Taken on 31 August 2020

35mm · Film photography · Photography

Street corner

Just a street corner, I guess, but that never stopped Stephen Shore!

It’s yet another shot that is blessed by beautiful oblique sunlight. I’m not sure the image would have worked without the side-light – the brickwork has acquired wonderful texture due to the relief cast upon it. I like the little details in the photograph too: the hydrant; the wall-mounted sign and it’s perfect shadow, the creamy tones of the whites.

Sometimes I see things that shout to me “this is a photograph”. I’m not sure everyone (or anyone) else would agree, but I’m very happy with this one.

Street corner

Minolta SRT 101b, Rokkor 50mm f/1.7 & Ilford HP5+.

Taken on 27 February 2020

35mm · Film photography · Photography

Through sunlit trees

Today’s picture is another photograph making use of glorious low sunlight. I like the way that the building – Chesterfield Town Hall – is obscured behind the trees. It gives it a bit of an air of mystery, I think.

In other news, it seems that both #FP4Party and Expired Film Day have crept around again, so I best get myself sorted for those – although, in the case of the former, I already have, and scanned some Holga-shot FP4+ negatives today.

For the latter, I have three rolls of expired film defrosting – one relatively fresh roll of Ektachrome 100 that’s dated 2008, a roll of Kodacolor Gold 200 from 1989, and oldest of all, some TriFCA from 1975 (which I’m not even sure the local lab will process – I shall ask them before I shoot it!). Shooting days are this weekend (13-15 March).

Through the trees

Minolta SRT 101b, Rokkor 50mm f/1.7 & Ilford HP5+.

Taken on 27 February 2020

35mm · Film photography · Photography

Lines of shadow

A few weeks ago I bought another new (to me) camera – I really need to try and stop doing this! Anyway’ the camera in question is a Minolta SRT 101b SLR and came with a Rokkor 50mm f/1.7 lens attached. The light seals looked a little shabby, so I replaced them, but the camera is otherwise in excellent condition. The camera uses the old mercury cells, so I’ve fitted it with a Wein cell to allow the meter to function correctly.

On a diagonal

It’s very much in the traditional 1970s SLR mold – silver body with black leatherette. It’s considerably heavier and bulkier than my Olympius OM-1, which is a similar camera in terms of features.

I popped in a roll of Delta 400 to test the camera and went for a walk around the flea market in Chesterfield when I had a day off recently. The camera handled the lighting with aplomb, giving good metering whether under the shadows of the stalls, or when in bright sunlight and, now that I’ve confirmed it’s working ok (everything seems fine, although the mirror occasionally sticks up after the shutter fires – although it drops back on the film advance action), I’ll take it out again when I get chance.

Both of today’s photos were taking in the same covered arcade on teh edge of the town centre.

Lines of contrast

Minolta SRT 101b, Rokkor 50mm f/1.7 & Ilford HP5+.

Taken on 27 February 2020

35mm · Film photography · Photography

Chesterfield market

As an adjunct to yesterday’s post about the old Chesterfield Magistrate’s Court building, today I’m posting some photos of Chesterfield market, which is a mere stone’s throw away from the court (with a good arm, at least).

Chesterfield’s markets cover two outdoor areas with covered stalls, and a market hall with indoor stalls that sits between the two (the hall, with its clocktower,  can be seen in the first picture in today’s set). Thursday morning features a flea market, from which I’ve had a camera bargain or two in the past. I’m not sure which days the markets are busiest, but there were a noticable number of unoccupied stalls on the day I took these pictures.

Again, these are shot on the Lloyds Paharmacy 200 expired film, so the colours are a little off and the contrast is pretty high, but it hasn’t turned out too badly all things considered.

The first and final images are my favourites.

FILM - Chesterfield market

FILM - Chesterfield market-2

FILM - Chesterfield market-3

FILM - Chesterfield market-4

FILM - Chesterfield market-5

Nikon F70, Nikkor 50mm f/1.8 D & Lloyds Pharmacy 200 (expired).

Taken on 30 September 2019

35mm · Film photography · Photography

The old Chesterfield Magistrate’s Court

A few months ago I was given a couple of rolls of film by one of the ladies at the local photographic society. Both were Lloyds Pharmacy 200, with an expiry date of 2008. You can’t get much more “drugstore film” than this, I guess. Some research suggests that it is actually Solaris Color FG Plus 200 that has been rebranded.

Both rolls have been sat in my freezer since then, so I decided last week to shoot one of them. Given the age of the film and the fact that I didn’t really know it’s provenance, I decided to rate it at 80ASA and loaded it into my Nikon F70. It turned out to be in a pretty good state, and rating it at 80ASA was probably too much – most of the images are a little overexposed, although I’ve recovered them pretty well in Lightroom. Otherwise, while there are some minor colour shifts, and the shadows are not the best, it’s not too bad. I’ll have much more confidence when I shoot the remaining roll.

I’m always a little wary of putting too much effort into making photographs with expired film, at least unless I’ve already had satisfactory results from a roll from the same batch, and this was very much the case with this roll. Most of the frames were shot on a walk around Chesterfield town centre, and the ones shown in this post are of the old Magistrate’s Court building.

The building was constructed in the early 1960s and was in use until the 2000s when a new building was constructed about half a mile from the old site. Since then the building has fallen into disrepair. As it is Grade II listed, it cannot be demolished, but there are apparently plans afoot to convert it into residential use.

It’s an interesting structure and one I’ve photographed on more than one occasion, so here are a few of the most recent pictures. I think the fourth photo, with the roosting pigeons, is my favourite.

FILM - The old Chesterfield Magistrate's Court building

FILM - The old Chesterfield Magistrate's Court building-2

FILM - The old Chesterfield Magistrate's Court building-3

FILM - The old Chesterfield Magistrate's Court building-4

FILM - The old Chesterfield Magistrate's Court building-5

FILM - The old Chesterfield Magistrate's Court building-6

Nikon F70, Nikkor 50mm f/1.8 D & Lloyds Pharmacy 200 (expired).

Taken on 30 September 2019

35mm · Film photography · Photography

Crooked

The Crooked Spire is the dominant landmark in the town of Chesterfield, not too far from where I live. It sits atop the Church of St Mary and All Saints and there are a number of legends as to how it became this way, but the actual reason given is that it is due to uneven heating on the lead coating of the spire from the southerly sun, which results in uneven contraction and expansion, and that the original structure was both made from unseasoned wood and not designed to bear the weight of the lead.

FILM - Crooked

Olympus Trip 35 & Fomapan 400.

Taken on 14 March 2019